1. Travel documents
    It is your sole responsibility to ensure that you - and any child travelling with you - have all the travel documents necessary to enter in, or transit through, each country on your itinerary. Please ensure you verify the requirements for each country as the required documents for the outbound portion of your travel may differ from those required on the return.
  2. Along with the normal travel documents required to enter Canada, additional documents may be required depending on your country of origin, even if they are used solely to land in Canada and re-board a connecting flight.
  3. Canadian and U.S. citizens must present either a valid passport or a valid Nexus card when travelling by air between Canada and the United States.
    Foreign nationals must ensure that they have all of the necessary documents in hand (e.g. valid passport, visa, permanent resident card).
    Landed immigrants in Canada seeking to enter the United States as non-immigrants must possess a valid passport and valid non-immigrant visa in order to enter.
    For more information visit the U.S. Bureau of Consular Affairs website.
    See the Travel documents for children section on this page for important information.
    For more information on travel documents and travel to the U.S., visit:
    the Canada Border Services Agency website
    the U.S. Bureau of Consular Affairs website
    our Customs and Immigration Information page
  4. A valid passport is required to travel to foreign countries for MOST travellers, including children. Some countries may even require a visa. For detailed information on travel to other countries, including entry and exit requirements and any travel advisories, please visit the Canadian Foreign Affairs and International Trade website, or contact the local consulate or embassy of the country you are visiting. Find a list of embassies on the Embassy World website.
    Only Canadian permanent residents from non visa-waiver countries travelling outside Canada are required to carry a valid Canadian permanent resident (PR) card or a valid visa, in addition to a valid passport, to return to Canada. The IMM1000 Record of Landing is no longer acceptable. Without a valid Canadian PR Card or valid visa, these passengers are not permitted to board the aircraft, and will need to contact the nearest Canadian embassy or consulate to obtain a limited use travel document to re-enter Canada. For more information, please visit the Citizenship and Immigration Canada website.
  5. Easier transit via Canada for travel to the U.S.
    Air Canada is an approved air carrier participating in the Canadian government's Transit without Visa (TWOV) program, and China Transit Program (CTP). This participation allows Air Canada's customers who are citizens of certain Asian countries and who are transiting through either Vancouver Airport or Toronto-Pearson Airport to travel to or from the U.S. without obtaining a Canadian temporary resident visa under certain specific conditions.
  6. Electronic System for Travel Authorization (ESTA):
    Effective March 15, 2010, citizens from countries participating in the US Visa Waiver Program who wish to travel by air to the United States must obtain approval through the Electronic System for Travel Authorization (ESTA) using the convenient ESTA online form. Passengers who have not obtained prior approval via ESTA prior to departure will be denied boarding.
    For a list of VWP countries or to learn more about ESTA, visit the U.S. Bureau of Consular Affairs website.
    Canadian permanent residents from non visa-waiver countries:
    Canadian permanent residents from non visa-waiver countries travelling outside Canada are required to carry a valid Canadian permanent resident (PR) card or a valid visa, in addition to a valid passport, to return to Canada. The IMM1000 Record of Landing is no longer acceptable. Without a valid Canadian PR Card or valid visa, these passengers are not permitted to board the aircraft, and will need to contact the nearest Canadian embassy or consulate to obtain a limited use travel document to re-enter Canada. For more information, please visit the Citizenship and Immigration Canada website.
    Canadian Certificates of Citizenship are not valid for travel.
    See the Travel documents for children section on this page for important information.
    The Customs and Immigration Information page offers additional information for travel to and from the United-States.
  7. Passports
    Your passport remains the best internationally-accepted evidence of your citizenship. It may be required for any number of financial or legal transactions abroad, and can be replaced if stolen while you are away, unlike a birth certificate or driver's license.
    You and your family need valid passports for travel to most countries, including return travel to Canada. Never assume otherwise. If you do not have a valid passport, we strongly recommend that you apply for a new one well in advance of travel plans.
    Canadian and U.S. citizens must present a valid passport or a valid Nexus card when travelling by air between Canada and the United States.
    Nexus card holders who are permanent residents of Canada or the U.S. must travel with a passport and proof of permanent residence, in addition to their Nexus card, and may be asked to present these documents upon arrival at the border.
    Foreign nationals must ensure that they have all of the necessary documents in hand (e.g. valid passport, visa, permanent resident card).
    Some countries require that your passport be valid for six months beyond your date of entry. You are advised to check the Voyage.gc.ca website to establish whether the six-month rule applies to your destination.
  8. Travel documents for children
    Canada does not permit children to travel on their parent's passport, even though some countries still allow it. For travel to countries where a passport is required, all Canadians, including children, must carry their own.
    In addition, the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) has recommended a policy requiring every individual, including a child, who travels by air to have his or her own travel document.
    A child must hold a valid passport for all international travel. Furthermore, prior to any international travel that includes a child, parents should contact the Embassy or Consulate of all countries the child will be visiting to enquire about entry and exit requirements.
    The following documents are recommended for travel within Canada and may also be required for international travel to/from certain countries.
    The child’s birth certificate showing the names of both parents.
    Any legal documents pertaining to custody.
    A parental consent letter authorizing travel (if the child is travelling with one parent, the letter must be signed and dated by the other parent; if the child is travelling without his parents, the letter must be signed and dated by both parents.)
    A death certificate if one of the parents is deceased
    We invite you to view more information on travelling with an infant or child, and valuable information from the Government of Canada on children and travel.
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  10. Visas
    You should check with your travel agent or the appropriate foreign diplomatic or consular missions about the visa requirements for the countries that you plan to visit or transit through.
    Obtain visas well in advance of your anticipated departure date; this may involve mailing your passport to the visa-issuing mission.
    Some countries require passports to be valid for a minimum period before they will issue a visa.
    There may be an extended delay if you apply for a visa from a third country while you are travelling.
    Visas can be quite expensive. You should include their cost in the budget for your trip. Make photocopies of your visas, and keep them separate from the originals.
    For extensive details regarding country-specific visa & health entry requirements, you can visit the Star Alliance Visa & Health search tool in order to determine what you will need for your trip.
  11. Entry and exit requirements
    On your arrival in a foreign country, be prepared to prove that you have sufficient funds to support yourself during your intended stay and that you will be admitted to the next country on your itinerary. (For example, have a visa for that country if it's required.) Many countries will grant entry only if you're in possession of return or onward tickets.
    Some countries impose exit controls, which may include exit permits, proof of payment of local taxes if applicable, payment or sometimes very costly fines for visa overstays, etc. In some countries, you must register with local authorities if you're not staying at a recognized hotel. Otherwise, your departure may be delayed, or you may be fined when you leave.
  12. Permanent resident (PR) cards
    All Canadian permanent residents travelling outside Canada are required to carry a valid Canadian permanent resident (PR) card or a valid visa, in addition to a valid passport, to return to Canada by commercial carrier. The PR card provides proof of your immigration status. Without it, you will not be allowed to board the carrier back to Canada. Canadian citizens do not need a PR card.
    The PR card is valid for five years. CHECK THE EXPIRY DATE AND APPLY FOR A NEW ONE AT LEAST TWO MONTHS BEFORE YOU TRAVEL.
  13. For more information on valid Canadian travel documents and current application processing times, visit the Passport Canada and Citizenship and Immigration Canada websites.